Monthly Archives: October 2018

Yes, your pet can tell time

Are you taking your time when feeding your pet? Fluffy and Fido are on to you -- and they can tell when you are dawdling.

A new study from Northwestern University has found some of the clearest evidence yet that animals can judge time. By examining the brain's medial entorhinal cortex, the researchers discovered a previously...

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Invasive species in an ecosystem harm native organisms but aid other invasive species

The presence of an invasive species in an ecosystem makes native organisms more susceptible to pollutants and may encourage the spread of additional invasive species, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

Binghamton faculty, along with graduate and undergraduate students, examined the effects of native vs. invasive plant leaf litter and...

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Biodiversity for the birds

Human-dominated landscapes are one of the most rapidly expanding and least-understood ecosystems on Earth. Historically, in urban areas, landowners convert native plant communities into habitats dominated by non-native species. While less susceptible to pest damage and demanding less maintenance, non-native plants are extremely poor at supporting insects -- critical food for higher order consumers like...

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Tortoise evolution: How did they become so big?

Tortoises are a group of terrestrial turtles globally distributed in habitats ranging from deserts to forests and include species such as the Greek and the Galapagos tortoise. Some species evolved large body sizes with a shell length exceeding 1 metre whereas others are no larger than 6-8 centimetres. Despite a particular interest from naturalists ever...

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