Blog

Paleontologists put the bite on an ancient reptile from New England

Scientists have identified a new species of reptile from prehistoric Connecticut and, boy, does it have a mouth on it.

Named Colobops noviportensis, the creature lived 200 million years ago and had exceptionally large jaw muscles -- setting it apart from other reptiles at the time. Even compared to the wide diversity of reptile species today,...

Read more

Non-psychoactive cannabis ingredient could help addicts stay clean

A preclinical study in rats has shown that there might be value in using a non-psychoactive and non-addictive ingredient of the Cannabis sativa plant to reduce the risk of relapse among recovering drug and alcohol addicts. The study's findings inform the ongoing debate about the possible medical benefits of non-psychoactive cannabinoids, and the way that...

Read more

Rival competition makes ant sperm better swimmers

Ant sperm recognize rival sperm and become more mobile, faster and straighter swimmers as a result, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology. The study looked at the factors that modify sperm behavior when there is competition with sperm from other males in a social insect which only mates...

Read more

Deep impact: Deep-sea wildlife more vulnerable to extinction than first thought

We have only known about the existence of the unusual yeti crabs (Kiwaidae) -- a family of crab-like animals whose hairy claws and bodies are reminiscent of the abominable snowman -- since 2005, but already their future survival could be at risk.

New Oxford University research suggests that past environmental changes may have profoundly impacted the...

Read more

Research suggests low density of snow leopards in Nepal`s Conservation Area

The snow leopard is a mammal species of the cat family found at high altitudes in Nepal and other countries around the Himalayan range. However, it has been included in the vulnerable category of IUCN Red list of threatened species in recent years for various reasons.

A recent research article published in the journal Banko Janakari...

Read more

Gut bacteria can mean life or death for birds

In her upcoming thesis at Lund University in Sweden, biologist Elin Videvall shows that the composition of gut bacteria in birds has a major impact on whether their offspring will survive their first three months.

"My findings could be important for increasing survival rates," she says.

Microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi can cause diseases, but...

Read more