Monthly Archives: September 2016

Feral chickens spread light on evolution

Different genes are involved during the adaptation of a domestic animal to life in the wild than when a wild animal becomes domesticated. This is the conclusion of a study led by a researcher at Linköping University in Sweden and published in the journal Nature Communications. The results increase our understanding of what happens as...

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Why aren't some dogs walked regularly?

A new study from the University of Liverpool in collaboration with The University of Western Australia has examined why some people feel motivated to walk their dogs regularly and others don't.

There are more than 8 million dogs in households across the UK. Unfortunately not all of them are taken for regular walks.

The study, led by...

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Wind turbines killing more than just local birds

Wind turbines are known to kill large birds, such as golden eagles, that live nearby. Now there is evidence that birds from up to hundreds of miles away make up a significant portion of the raptors that are killed at these wind energy fields.

Using DNA from tissue and stable isotopes from the feathers of golden...

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Good food puts bees in good mood

Biologists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered that after bumblebees drink a small droplet of really sweet sugar water, they behave like they are in a positive emotion-like state.

We all know what it's like to taste our favourite food and instantly feel good about the world but the same phenomenon may happen...

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Evolution of a species also involves the bacteria it carries

Animals live in close association with microorganisms, carrying beneficial bacteria while coping with pathogenic infections. Now, in a study published this week in Plos Genetics, researchers from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC, Portugal) discovered that symbiotic bacteria play a direct role in the evolution of their host, shaping the way it adapts to pathogens.

More and...

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Ancient reptile fossils claw for more attention

Newly recovered fossils confirm that Drepanosaurus, a prehistoric cross between a chameleon and an anteater, was a small reptile with a fearsome finger. The second digit of its forelimb sported a massive claw.

Scientists analyzed 212-million-year-old Drepanosaurus arm fossils that were discovered at the Hayden Quarry in Ghost Ranch, New Mexico. The researchers describe their findings...

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